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with jim davis, executive director of the colorado department of public safety. he's also chair of the national governor's association homeland security advisors council. among big events he's worked on was the 2008 democratic national convention in denver. and ed cannon, currently of t&m protection resources, a private security consulting firm. he was formerly an assistant chief of the new york city police department, and helped set up security for that city's marathon and many other events. well, jim davis, starting with you, how does boston change things for people in your position? what kinds of discussions are going on now? >> well, certainly we're much more focused on security. you know, in the united states we've got pretty short memories and i think after 9/11 we were very focused on security and then things kind of we'd go through a time period where we don't a lot of attacks or any successful attacks and now boston happens and people get focused on it again. i think that in the -- in law enforcement and intelligence community we've always been focused on it but people
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
a jim demint exit at exit security system as well as economic conditions is a good thing. a variety of economic legislation in this are good on balance. >> i want america to win. >> me too. craig huey about how the u.s. is not using immigration policy effectively and as many other countries are to improve economic growth. what countries did you see as doing a good job? numbers, look at the it's in my written testimony, under core visas are for economic reasons at the moment. given the paramount need for economic growth, that cuts across our ability to deal with all our policy challenges, those will all be easier with faster economic growth. focusing on that makes more sense. other countries, we have charts in the written testimony, have a high percentage. other countries that have made reforms recently like the united kingdom looking to do this. if you look at the countries that are struggling right now and likely to fail, dejapan. europe, the exception is germany, which has undertaken a particular percentage of turkish labor. we have to recognize economic reality and adjust our pol
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5